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Best Snowshoeing Food:
What To Bring Next Time

The best snowshoeing food tastes great, doesn't weigh a lot, and provides bountiful, easy to digest calories to fuel your winter adventure.

Can all of this be achieved in one little snowshoeing lunch?

Yes!

Wondering what to eat and drink when you snowshoe? Here are some great tips for the best snowshoeing food from a seasoned snowshoer.


Calories count!
But don't count them

The best snowshoeing food is nutrient dense, providing lots of winter hiking fuel.

Calories, in other words.

If you're in the habit of counting calories for weight maintenance, a snowshoeing hike is an exception to your rule.

Your body is doing a lot of important work when you snowshoe:

  • Keeping your core body temperature in a normal range.
  • Giving your big muscle groups in your legs, arms and back all of the fuel needed to get you where you're going
  • Sending lots of energy to your brain so you can make good decisions about turn around time, handling weather changes, and more

So read up on hiking calories here, and embrace the fact that all of your winter exertions are burning A LOT OF THEM!!

  • For an exact calculation, go here and be surprised, really surprised.
Snowshoers working hard going uphill need the best snowshoeing food.It takes a lot of calories to carry your gear and your lunch when you snowshoe. Especially when you're breaking trail like this.


The best snowshoeing food doesn't freeze solid in your pack!

Even on a mild winter day, the temperature is low enough to damage watery or fragile food in your backpack.

Avoid these foods:

  • Juicy fruit: oranges, apples, grapes
  • Watery veggies: celery, carrots, tomatoes
  • Lettuce or sprouts on sandwiches
  • Berries

In addition to being filled with water, these foods are low calorie and not giving you much in the way of carbohydrates.

Not sure why carbohydrates are your friend during strenuous workouts like snowshoeing?

  • Read up on carbs here

So what should a snowshoer bring for lunch?

Something that doesn't take any prep after you pull it out of your pack, and won't freeze quickly.

  • Sandwiches packed full of energy: nut butter & jam
  • High quality chocolate
  • Nuts
  • Trail snacks that can stand up to the cold

Bring a piping hot beverage, too

While water and sports drinks are great on hot summer day hikes, you might come to appreciate the lift to your spirits associated with a piping hot beverage.

When you pull it out of your pack, watch the appreciation wash over your trail buddy's face, too.

You'll need to find a suitable insulated container for your beverage.

What kind of beverage should you bring along to warm yourself up when you stop for lunch?

Skip anything with alcohol in it, because alcoholic beverages will cause your body temperature to drop. Sounds weird, I know, because you might feel warmer at first after a few sips of the hard stuff.

Instead, go back to the idea of calories as your friends on a snowshoe hike.

Put these hot combos into your body, and you'll feel warm and have lots of stamina to get back to the trail head, too:

  • Almond milk and chai tea
  • Hot chocolate made with any type of milk you enjoy
  • Lemonade, ginger and green tea

Or use my simple favorite: hot chocolate almond milk. Yum!

You can read my review of a wide mouth insulated Hydroflask carrying that very thing right here.


Grab lunch and get outside

If the idea of snowshoeing appeals to you, and you've never tried it, now you know what to eat and drink when you snowshoe.

To get started with this great winter sport, try these tips.

If you're an experienced snowshoer, don't forget how to stay safe out there.

And for everyone having fun in the snow, here's my best tip:

Eat well and often!


Eat well on a winter hike by following these 7 tips at Hiking For Her.

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